You can’t expect people to change magically.

 

If you want your home to change, you need to set consequences when people don’t change. And rewards when they do. It’s as simple as that.

 

Or is it?

 

Lori, conducting our book club, says this:

 

This is likely not going to be a walk in the park on a lovely spring day.

The day that I filled the black bag was not one of the our best. My kids tried all of the countermoves that Sheila says to expect.

They tried.

I stuck to my guns. The contents of the bag remains sitting in my closet is getting smaller as they prove that taking care of their things is important. Change takes time! I gave a lot of thought to this consequence. In no way did I want to single anyone out or withold love or acceptance. What I did, I did out of love, and they know that…now.

Sheila offers other ideas for consequences in this chapter and some of them are brilliant! The “jubilee” basket which is taken from the Old Testament. In the Old Testament the land was returned to the original owner after a period of time. (page 133) Just after that suggestion, Sheila mentions how there have been times where they have had to call in the garbage bags! I LOVE this woman!

Another idea that I found useful and one that we have begun to use in my home is the idea, “If you Made the Dinner, You Don’t Clean Up.” She recommends that when children are old enough, they load the dishwasher and clear the table. Let everyone know that if they help prepare the meal then that evening they are off of clean up duty. It encourages help and it encourages responsibility as well as teach them practical life skills. As they get older, have them engage in helping plan meals, which will eventually lead to them preparing a meal.

Sing it Aretha…Sing it girl!
R~E~S~P~E~C~T

Read the rest here, including tips on allowances, how to get kids to “carry their own load”, and more!